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Hearing Exam

I offer this service. 

The following is from the Indiana State Hearing:

“Why is a newborn hearing screen important? Without a hearing screen an infant with a hearing loss is usually identified later in childhood, usually around 24-30 months of age. Infants learn a great amount during the first months of life even though they will not typically speak their first words until 12 months of age. Identifying hearing loss and providing early intervention improves a child’s language development.”

“Can I wait to have my infant’s hearing tested? The younger the infant, the more likely the infant will sleep during the test. As infants get older (three to four months), they are more alert and restless. It is also important that your infant does not miss out on early language development. Infants begin learning language during the first months of life. An infant with hearing loss needs extra help in communicating and understanding language. If an infant needs extra help, you want to start as early as possible.”

“What if I cannot afford to pay for the evaluation? If your insurance company does not cover a referral for a hearing evaluation, children’s ” Special Health Care Services (CSHCS) is a program that may be able to help. (Assess if the family needs help getting in touch with CSHCS. Have local telephone number available to facilitate contact. Also give out 1-800-359-3722 for CSHCS. The operator can connect family to local CSHCS if long distance toll is a factor.)  Link 1  Link       Link  

Critical Congenital Heart Disease Newborn Screening

This is a state Mandated test. Why do we do this?

About three percent of all babies are born with a birth defect. Overall, nearly one percent of all newborns have a congenital heart defect (CHD). CHDs are the leading cause of birth defect-associated infant illness and death.

About 18 per 10,000 babies are born with critical congenital heart defects (CCHDs, also known as critical congenital heart disease), which are life threatening and require catheter-based intervention or heart surgery during the neonatal period. Delayed diagnosis of CCHD may result in the child having a poorer preoperative condition and worse cardiopulmonary and neurological outcomes after treatment

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